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Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA)

The Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) was signed into federal law on March 18, 2020, and is effective from April 1, 2020, through December 31, 2020. Included in the law, were two new paid leave provisions: Emergency Paid Sick Leave (EPSL), and Expanded Family and Medical Leave (EFML), that will allow the university to provide additional paid time off to those affected by COVID-19.

View your Employee Rights under the FFCRA.

Employees Eligibility

To determine if you are eligible for paid leave under the FFCRA, please complete the questionnaire.

Emergency Paid Sick Leave (EPSL)

University employees are eligible for up to two weeks (80 hours for full-time; prorated for part-time) of paid sick leave if they are unable to work their scheduled weekly hours either on campus or remotely because they:

  1. are subject to a Federal, State, or local quarantine or isolation order related to COVID-19;
  2. have been advised by a health care provider to self-quarantine related to COVID-19;
  3. are experiencing COVID-19 symptoms and are seeking a medical diagnosis;
  4. are caring for an individual subject to a quarantine or isolation order as described in (1), or has been advised to self-isolate as described in (2);
  5. are caring for their child(ren) whose school or place of care is closed, or whose child care provider is unavailable due to COVID-19 related reasons; or
  6. are experiencing any other substantially-similar conditions specified by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Employees will receive 100% pay for all time taken under the EPSL, regardless of the qualifying reason.

Expanded Family and Medical Leave (EFML)

Employees who have been employed for at least 30 days, may be eligible for up to 12 weeks (480 hours for full-time; prorated for part-time) of leave to care for their child whose school or place of care is closed, or whose child care provider is unavailable due to COVID-19 related reasons.

The first two weeks of EFML are unpaid and may be used concurrently with EPSL or accrued leave time. The remaining 10 weeks of EFML are paid at 2/3 pay. Employees may use their available accrued leave time to supplement the other 1/3 of their pay while taking time off under the EFML.

EFML is an expansion of the current Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), so prior usage of FMLA leave may impact eligibility for EFML. In addition, the use of EFML now may impact future eligibility for FMLA.

The usage scenarios below provide guidance on how to use Emergency Paid Sick Leave (EPSL) and Expanded Family and Medical Leave (EFML) for various absences related to COVID-19.

FFCRA Usage Scenarios for Employees

I am an employee who is unable to work due to a Federal, State, or local quarantine or isolation order related to COVID-19. What do I do about my time?

  • Ask your supervisor about flexible work arrangements that will allow you to work remotely.
  • If you are unable able to work remotely, or unable to work all of your scheduled weekly hours remotely, then you may take Emergency Paid Sick Leave (EPSL) to account for the hours you are unable to work.
  • If you exhaust your ten days of EPSL, then you should use accrued sick, annual, or compensatory time as appropriate.

I am an employee who is unable to work because I have been advised by a health care provider to self-quarantine related to COVID-19. What do I do about my time?

  • Ask your supervisor about flexible work arrangements that will allow you to work remotely.
  • If you are unable able to work remotely, or unable to work all of your scheduled weekly hours remotely, then you may take Emergency Paid Sick Leave (EPSL) to account for the hours you are unable to work.
  • If you exhaust your ten days of EPSL, then you should use accrued sick, annual, or compensatory time, as appropriate.

I am an employee who is unable to work because I am experiencing COVID-19 symptoms and I am seeking a medical diagnosis. What do I do about my time?

  • If you feel well enough to work remotely, then you may ask your supervisor about flexible work arrangements that will allow you to do so.
  • If you are unable able to work remotely, or unable to work all of your scheduled weekly hours remotely, then you may take Emergency Paid Sick Leave (EPSL) to account for the hours you are unable to work.
  • If you exhaust your ten days of EPSL, then you should use your accrued sick, annual, or compensatory time) as appropriate.

I am an employee who is unable to work because I am caring for someone who is subject to a federal, state, or local quarantine order, or has been advised to self-quarantine by a healthcare provider. What do I do about my time?

  • If you feel well enough to work remotely, then you may ask your supervisor about flexible work arrangements that will allow you to do so.
  • If you are unable able to work remotely, or unable to work all of your scheduled weekly hours remotely, then you may take Emergency Paid Sick Leave (EPSL) to account for the hours you are unable to work.
  • If you exhaust your ten days of EPSL, then you should use your accrued sick, annual, or compensatory time as appropriate.

I am an employee who is unable to work because I am caring for my child whose school or place of care is closed, or whose childcare provider is unavailable due to COVID-19 related reasons. What do I do about my time?

  • Ask your supervisor about flexible work arrangements that will allow you to work on-site or remotely.
  • If you are unable able to work, or unable to work all of your scheduled weekly hours, then you may take Emergency Paid Sick Leave (EPSL) to account for the hours you are unable to work.
  • If your leave is expected to continue for more than two weeks, you may also apply for Expanded Family and Medical Leave (EFML).
  • The first two weeks of EFML are unpaid but may run concurrently with EPSL so that you continue to receive 100% of your regular pay. If you have exhausted your ten days of EPSL, then you should use your accrued sick, annual, or compensatory time as appropriate.
  • After the first two weeks, all remaining time taken under the EFML (up to an additional 10 weeks) will be paid at 2/3 your regular pay.
  • You may also choose to use your accrued sick, annual, or compensatory time instead of EFML, so that you will continue to receive 100% of your regular pay